What We Do

We Rescue, Rehabilitate, and Release Black-tailed fawns back into the wild.


Educational Outreach Program

  • Fawn Rescue offers free wildlife talks for Sonoma County children. The talks are approximately one-half hour in length, followed by additional time for an open question and answer session. Topics covered include the rescue and rehabilitation of fawns, as well as adaptations, habitats, and preservation of local native wildlife. Teachers are welcome to request a particular focus for their talk. Read More.
  • Free talks are also offered to clubs and other private and public organizations.
  • a complete wildlife manual, “Black-Tailed Fawns – Care In Captivity”, purchased by other wildlife facilities throughout the United States, Canada, and abroad
  • a Fawn-Care Protocol offered by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife to other wildlife centers
  • wildlife articles written by Fawn Rescue are distributed to the public, wildlife centers, and wildlife publications nation wide

Fawn Rescue Provides a Public Safety Service

All Sonoma County fawns must come to Fawn Rescue for care. The transport of deer is a public issue, therefore, we must respond personally to each call, providing veterinary treatment when needed.

Because it is illegal for the public to possess fawns and the fact that fawns are wild, strong animals, Fawn Rescue has trained people who respond to concerns of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, Animal Regulation, the Humane Society, animal care agencies, all Sonoma County wildlife centers, Police and Sheriff Departments, Park Rangers, veterinarians and the public’s calls for assistance seven days a week during fawn season (March-September). Since 1989, Fawn Rescue has provided this unique and much needed service to the community.


Fawn Disease Research

Fawn Rescue worked closely with a pathologist in fawn disease research. Our submitted samples of a unique and life threatening disease enabled this doctor and diagnostic lab to successfully isolate and identify a genetically distinct, deer-specific, viral disease, Deer PoxVirus, likely comprising a new genus! A giant step for wildlife! And through this same pathologist Fawn Rescue discovered a second deer disease, Hair Loss Syndrome, new to the state of California.


Fawn Formula

Back in 1989, no formula was available which specifically addressed the rich nutritional needs of the Black-Tailed fawn. Fawn Rescue requested an animal nutrition company to manufacture a new, specialized formula using the analysis of the doe’s milk. Now fawns thrive and lives are being saved throughout the entire west coast region.

Marjorie Davis – Founder – 1989 Raises Fawns

Marjorie Davis In the News!


supporters of Fawn Rescue

Fund-raising at Oakmont

Fund-raising Activities

Fawn Rescue is a nonprofit public benefit 501(c)(3) association, working under a Memo Of Understanding issued by the State of California Department of Fish and Wildlife. We assume entire responsibility for our own funding. We receive no Federal, State, or County funding. We are funded strictly through donations.


Awards

  • California Legislature and Assembly Resolution for unparalleled achievements for wildlife and the public
  • California Department of Fish and Game Director’s Achievement Award for outstanding support of wildlife protection and conservation
  • Statement of Appreciation from Wildlife Investigations Laboratory of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife for pioneering techniques in the rehabilitation of fawns
  • United States Congressional Recognition award as one of the twenty-five top Bay Area volunteers and for outstanding and invaluable service to the community.
  • Sonoma Ecology Center Environmental Award in recognition of outstanding contributions for our environment and our community
  • American Red Cross Award for many years of dedication to the rescue of ill, orphaned and injured deer, and
  • Earth Elders of Sonoma County award in recognition of devotion to the work necessary to sustain life on this planet for future generations.

Reports of Fawn Rescue’s achievements have been published in national magazines, syndicated newspapers, network and cable television, radio, and public service videos.


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